Phase 2 - In-Depth Engagement

Consultation has concluded

*Engagement is now closed*

Thank you very much for your contributions to Phase 2! Check out what's happening during the 2020-2025 Draft Plan consultation here.

"What comes out of this very important process, will have impacts right across the community", Rob Stobbe, CEO.

Every five years all network businesses undergo a regulatory reset process, run by the Australian Energy Regulator (AER). As part of this process, SA Power Networks will develop a Regulatory Proposal that outlines our plans for 2020-2025 for the distribution network.

We are seeking the views of our customers in developing this Regulatory Proposal through a state-wide engagement program. The In-Depth phase of this program provides diverse opportunities for community members from across SA to engage in dialogue that will inform our plans.

Consultation is now closed and the feedback we received is listed below:

  • View community comments in the discussion forums
  • See the outcomes of our quick polls
  • Understand peoples experiences by viewing the map tools
  • View the questions received and answers provided
  • Register with the site to receive a regular newsletter and be invited to join the next phase of engagement.

Help shape SA's energy network of the future.

*Engagement is now closed*

Thank you very much for your contributions to Phase 2! Check out what's happening during the 2020-2025 Draft Plan consultation here.

"What comes out of this very important process, will have impacts right across the community", Rob Stobbe, CEO.

Every five years all network businesses undergo a regulatory reset process, run by the Australian Energy Regulator (AER). As part of this process, SA Power Networks will develop a Regulatory Proposal that outlines our plans for 2020-2025 for the distribution network.

We are seeking the views of our customers in developing this Regulatory Proposal through a state-wide engagement program. The In-Depth phase of this program provides diverse opportunities for community members from across SA to engage in dialogue that will inform our plans.

Consultation is now closed and the feedback we received is listed below:

  • View community comments in the discussion forums
  • See the outcomes of our quick polls
  • Understand peoples experiences by viewing the map tools
  • View the questions received and answers provided
  • Register with the site to receive a regular newsletter and be invited to join the next phase of engagement.

Help shape SA's energy network of the future.

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    The Jones family, featured in the Future Networks film below, want to increasingly take control of how and when they use energy, and where they get it from. They are considering rooftop solar.


    If the Jones’ invest in solar, we would typically expect them to save around $500 each year by reducing the amount of energy they need to buy from their retailer. They could also earn between $200 - $500 from energy they sell to their retailer depending on the current feed-in tariff offers.  We call this energy ‘exports’. All up, they may save between $700 and $1,000 on their bill.

    The near future may see 50% of houses in SA being powered by rooftop solar, or other non-traditional electricity generation sources. Rooftop solar isn’t controllable like large power stations, and if exports get too high it can put the overall reliability of the power system at risk. 

    We are considering ways to deal with this emerging issue of the network reaching its limit to support more solar exports, and have posted 3 possible solutions below. 

    1. Not allow exports from new installations. This means new solar customers will not be able to earn money from exports. This will be cost neutral to all customers. 
    2. Make network investments (for example, network upgrades, interconnectors and storage) to enable customers to continue to export energy as they currently do. This may increase costs to all customers by several hundred dollars per year.
    3. Require new solar installations to have some level of monitoring and control. This may increase up-front costs to new solar customers by a few hundred dollars, and may reduce their ability to earn money from exports by a small amount.
    What do you see as being the best solution to this issue? And why?

    The Jones family, featured in the Future Networks film below, want to increasingly take control of how and when they use energy, and where they get it from. They are considering rooftop solar.


    If the Jones’ invest in solar, we would typically expect them to save around $500 each year by reducing the amount of energy they need to buy from their retailer. They could also earn between $200 - $500 from energy they sell to their retailer depending on the current feed-in tariff offers.  We call this energy ‘exports’. All up, they may save between $700 and $1,000 on their bill.

    The near future may see 50% of houses in SA being powered by rooftop solar, or other non-traditional electricity generation sources. Rooftop solar isn’t controllable like large power stations, and if exports get too high it can put the overall reliability of the power system at risk. 

    We are considering ways to deal with this emerging issue of the network reaching its limit to support more solar exports, and have posted 3 possible solutions below. 

    1. Not allow exports from new installations. This means new solar customers will not be able to earn money from exports. This will be cost neutral to all customers. 
    2. Make network investments (for example, network upgrades, interconnectors and storage) to enable customers to continue to export energy as they currently do. This may increase costs to all customers by several hundred dollars per year.
    3. Require new solar installations to have some level of monitoring and control. This may increase up-front costs to new solar customers by a few hundred dollars, and may reduce their ability to earn money from exports by a small amount.
    What do you see as being the best solution to this issue? And why?
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    What information would you like to receive from SA Power Networks when there is an unplanned outage?How do you want to receive this information?

    Share your thoughts in the discussion forum below.



    What information would you like to receive from SA Power Networks when there is an unplanned outage?How do you want to receive this information?

    Share your thoughts in the discussion forum below.



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    How can SA Power Networks ensure an adequate and reliable supply of energy?

    • Share your ideas and experience in the discussion forum below. 
    • Don't forget to tell us where you live!

    We visited Mylor, Aldgate and Adelaide CBD earlier this year and spoke to some locals on their electricity reliability experience. Here is what they had to say.


    How can SA Power Networks ensure an adequate and reliable supply of energy?

    • Share your ideas and experience in the discussion forum below. 
    • Don't forget to tell us where you live!

    We visited Mylor, Aldgate and Adelaide CBD earlier this year and spoke to some locals on their electricity reliability experience. Here is what they had to say.


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    What are the characteristics of a sustainable supply of energy in SA?

    View our new film and share your thoughts in the forum discussion below.


    What are the characteristics of a sustainable supply of energy in SA?

    View our new film and share your thoughts in the forum discussion below.


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